I’m the guy that says women should go topless, but not for the reason you think

Oct. 12, 2015

Alexander Nedd
anedd@uccs.edu

Women should have the right to be shirtless in public.

Yes, I said it.

I know what you’re thinking; of course HE agrees with it, he’s a guy. What strapping, young, college male wouldn’t want to see women’s breasts?

To be honest, I don’t. As an out-and-proud male, girls are admittedly not my area of expertise. The day women are able to leave without a shirt might be the day I stay inside and be productive for once.

But I hope that day comes.

Women’s bodies are the most picked on, prodded at, politicized and sexualized canvas’ on earth, often at the hands of men.

That has to stop.

This shows we all need to have a conversation about discrimination, and there is no time like the present.

Many see women exposing their breasts as sexual; I think it’s the opposite. Breasts are a part of the human body, the same as feet, nose and arms.

They are natural and have no reproductive use. They help nurture life on this planet.

While they may look and work different on males and females, but they are ultimately the same, and are named as such. Not allowing women the right to bare their breasts once again places males on top.

European cultures share a softer side of human sexuality than the U.S., and their society behaves fine. Freeing the nipple would not be the end of the world, as some suggest.

How will we ever support gender equality if we continue to have different rules in place for men and women?

This isn’t about walking around naked or showing public indecency to children.

Allowing women the same choice as men furthers the thought of equality and the expression of free will. It’s your body, you should be allowed to do whatever you would like to and with it.

“But it’s offensive!”

Honestly, how does a boob offend you? I understand not wanting it shoved in your face, the same with other acts such as public displays of affection. But to say it offends you, a human body part that is used to nurture life, then you might have bigger problems.

“But what about the children?”

Instead of sheltering our children, we should teach them what it’s like to have a normal body, and to treat that body with respect.

As a man, I understand the privilege I have in not being judged should I take my shirt off while doing the incline in 90-degree heat. But it’s a privilege that can be easily extended to our female counterparts without making it a big deal.

That’s what needs to happen.

I choose the right for people to be able to think for themselves, and not judge others for their thought process as well.